There's a little bit of drama queen or king in all of us, but there are those among us who seem to take the cake. They are often excessively emotional, giving Oscar-worthy performances about the goings-on in their lives. Often, of course, this 'drama' is simply a ploy to garner up even more attention, and perhaps sympathy, for themselves.

Quite simply, drama queens and kings love attention, and when things start to get dull or someone else steps into the limelight temporarily they are desperate to have all eyes on them again. Aside from being attention-mongers, drama queens and kings can also exhibit the following qualities:
  • Emotional outbursts at least once a day, and sometimes more
  • Impatience for everyday life
  • Constantly comparing themselves to others, and trying to one-up their friends
  • Frequent complaining, with very little gratitude
  • Never feeling content with what they have


Drama queens and kings have a tendency to repel their friends and wreak havoc on most all of their personal relationships. Meanwhile, they are prone to being completely wrapped up in themselves, which in itself can lead to anxiety, stress, and even depression.

At the most basic level, though, drama kings and queens just want to feel important and loved. The problem lies in the way they go about it; they expect the entire world to stop to pay attention to their needs.

'We are all drama kings and queens to some extent because we believe deep inside that the world revolves around us. This belief distorts our perception and makes us feel like people should care about our story as much as we do,' says Hale Dwoskin, CEO and director of training of Sedona Training Associates.

If you are a drama queen or king, your life can take on greater meaning if you learn to let go of the notion that the world revolves around you. The Sedona Method is a simple, scientifically proven system that will show you how to let go of the constant need for attention and self-involvement and leave you free to develop deeper relationships, dreams and goals.

'When we release this tendency to be lost in our own world and story we discover that there are others and that our story is not as unique and special as we believed it was,' Dwoskin says.

'This frees us to keep our lives in better perspective and is not only a relief to the people around us but to ourselves as well,' he says.